“Enhancing vision today…to help reach goals for tomorrow” is more than a motto. It is the essence of our practice.—Dr. Wylie

Distortion-Free Optics™ Ultra light, ultra thin lenses mounted to hassle-free rimless frames.

Traditional rimless frames can distort the clarity of your lenses, and even cause them to break. That’s because rimless frame attachments create multiple stress points around the edges of the lens, which diminishes the optical performance.

HOYA and Avantek have partnered to create the first Distortion-Free vision system — a completely new approach to eyeglass lenses and frames — engineered without drill holes, wires, screws, or anything else that can distort your vision, or loosen, crack, or break your lenses.

This unprecedented achievement in engineering and design lets you select from an array of stylish rimless mounting options, which are then permanently bonded to the lightest lenses in the world. With Distortion-Free optics, your vision will never be distorted, and your lenses can’t fall out of the frames!

For loyal contact lens wearers, HOYA Distortion-Free Optics offers an unprecedented range of vision, like nothing you’ve ever seen, combined with the lightest weight lenses you’ve ever worn, all in a clean, minimalist design you have to see on for yourself.

 

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Remember back to the last time you experienced the birth of a baby.....What are one of the first questions people ask? It’s “ WHAT COLOR ARE THEIR EYES?

What makes the color of our eyes appear as they do? What role do genetics play? What if you don’t like your eye color..... can you change it? Are there any medications that can change the eye color? Get ready to explore the science behind eye color by starting at the beginning.......

Baby’s eye color can change. A baby can start out with blue eyes, for example, and change to brown as they age. It’s all dependent on a brown pigment called melanin which develops as a child ages. The more melanin present, the darker the eye color. Brown eyes have the most pigment saturation, green/hazel eyes have less melanin, and blue eyes have the least pigment. The color of eyes are dependent upon genetics. Genetics are complicated, but generally speaking brown trumps blue in the probabilities if there is a brown eyed parent. This is because darker pigment is the dominant trait in genetics. This isn’t to say that two brown eyed parents could not have a blue eyed child......its just very rare.

So what if you don’t like your eye color? Can you change it? Yes you can. The most common way is through cosmetically colored contact lenses. It’s possible to change almost any eye color, even changing brown to blue. A special colored dye is injected into the contact lens material creating magnificent colors. There have been surgical remedies to changing iris color but the risks far outweigh the benefits, so it is not recommended. Furthermore, contact lenses are medical devices that alter cellular tissue, so only get contacts by obtaining a prescription from an eye care practitioner.

Some medications can change eye color. A class of medication called prostaglandins, used to treat glaucoma, has a side effect of darkening the iris color. This same class, in a weaker strength, is used to lengthen eyelashes. Studies have shown that in a certain percentage of patients, lighter colored blue and green eyes, have turned brown.

So maybe Crystal Gayle was looking into a crystal ball when she sang, “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue “, predicting eye color changing medications to come.

Only science in the future holds the key to permanent eye color change. But in the meantime, genetics, medication, and cosmetic colored contact lenses can enhance and change the color of your eyes. 

 

The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

Comparison view of optomap retinal exam vs conventional exams

A snapshot view of the retinal images of conventional exams, such as slit lamp with 90 degree diopter, direct ophthalmoscope, indirect ophthalmoscope, and fundus camera compared with the optomap retinal exam image.

So you’ve had your eyes examined and picked out your new frames, and now you have an array of lens options from which to choose. One important option to consider is investing in an Anti-reflective coating, also known as AR coating. This feature has multiple advantages that can benefit almost anyone who wears glasses.

Today’s modern lens materials have a higher refraction index than previous materials did, which means they can produce a stronger prescription with a thinner and lighter piece of lens. The trade-off is that they are more prone to reflection and glare. AR coating will cut the glare, and also some formulations will even strengthen and harden the newer plastic materials.

If you drive at night, you probably have noticed that the headlights of the other cars make it hard to see. An Anti-reflective coating reduces the amount of glare you encounter, enabling you to be a safer night-driver.

AR coatings also benefit computer users. Tests have shown that glare from computer monitors can cause extra vision stress, and add pressure on the eyes. But with Anti-reflective lenses, computer users can work at their monitors with less irritation to their eyes.

Another benefit of AR coatings is that they actually let in more light. You will have better overall vision, with higher contrast and clarity—especially in dim settings.

And let’s not forget to point out that with AR-coated lenses your glasses will look better on you and in photos. Without the glare on the front of your glasses, people will be able to see your eyes more clearly—which is always a good thing!

Talk with your eye care professional to determine which AR lens coatings are best for your lifestyle and your lenses.   

What are conditions that can affect a child’s vision and the potential for learning? What is Amblyopia? What is Strabismus? What about Convergence Insufficiency? These are serious conditions of a child’s eye that need addressed. Did you know that 80% of learning comes through vision? The proverb that states, ”A picture is worth a thousand words” is true! But what if a child cannot visually see or process those words?

Let’s explore Amblyopia , or “lazy eye”. It affects 3-5% of the population, enough that the federal government funded children’s yearly eye exams into the Accountable Care Act or ObamaCare health initiative. Amblyopia occurs when the anatomical structure of the eye is normal, but the “brain -eye connection” is malfunctioning. In other words, it is like plugging in your computer to the outlet and the power never gets to the computer all the way.

Amblyopia need to be caught early in life, in fact if it is not caught and treated early (before age 8) it can lead to permanent vision impairment. Correction with glasses or contacts and patching the good eye daily are ways it is treated. Most eye doctors agree that the first exam should take place in the first year of life. Early detection is a key.

Strabismus is a condition that causes an eye to turn in (esotropia), out (exotropia), or vertically. It can be treated with glasses or contacts, and if needed surgery. Vision therapy or strategic eye exercises prescribed by a doctor can also improve this condition. In fact, vision therapy is the treatment of choice for Convergence Insufficiency.

When we read, our brain tells our eyes to turn in to a comfortable reading posture. In Convergence Insufficiency, the brain tells the eyes to turn in, but they instead turn out, causing tremendous strain on that child’s eye for reading. Another tell tale sign of this condition is the inability to cross your eyes when a target approaches. The practitioner will see instead, that one of the eyes kicks out as the near target approaches. This condition can be treated with reading glasses or contacts, and eye exercises that teach the muscles of the eye to align properly during reading.

It is important to understand the pediatric eye and all the treatments that can be implemented to augment the learning process. Preventative care in the form of early eye examinations can mean the difference between reading properly or struggling badly in a child’s learning. Remember, a young child can’t tell you if they have a vision impairment or not. For the success of the child: be proactive in encouraging exams in the first year of life and beyond.

 

The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

What is Presbyopia? What is a Cataract? What about Macular Degeneration or Dermatochalasis? What do they mean and how do they affect my eye or the eyes of my loved ones? These are all characteristics of the aging process and they can all be treated, and in some cases prevented.

At some point around 35 years old, the lens of the eye, responsible for focusing, starts losing that ability. It catches up with us visually in our early 40s through the symptoms of losing ability to see fine print. It is why the reading glasses business is a multimillion dollar business! This condition is called Presbyopia (Latin for “old eyes”). Presbyopia is treated through a variety of ways: reading glasses, bifocal glasses and contact lenses, and surgery. Presbyopia cannot be prevented but in some cases Macular Degeneration can be.

Macular Degeneration affects the back surface of the eye called the retina. The central processing center of vision takes place there. Small deposits of lipid and protein (called Drusen) build up causing a loss of central vision. The early symptoms are a need for more light when reading, then wavy lines occur which should be straight, then finally blind spots or scotomas centrally. Macular degeneration can be treated if caught early with medication and laser treatment. A dilated eye examination with your eye care practitioner yearly can detect this early so that intervention can lead to prevention of blindness. Smoking, sun exposure, and high cholesterol are factors that exacerbate the condition. However, eating certain foods such as broccoli, kale, and green leafy vegetables can give you the lutein that is required to prevent this condition. Lutein and antioxidants can be prescribed in a vitamin.

Dermatochalasis is lid drooping that causes the eyelid to cover a portion of the eye. It affects peripheral vision and is the natural sagging caused by loss of collagen elasticity in the skin. An eye lid surgery can remove the extra tissue and restore normal visual function again to the eyelid, and in some cases make you look younger!

Cataracts can be present at any age, even newborns. The most typical cataracts are seen after age 60. A cataract is a natural hardening of the lens of the eye which causes symptoms of glare at night, a need for more light when reading, and fuzzy or blurry vision that won’t clear with new glasses. Cataracts can be treated with surgery that restores visual function by way of an implant. Newer techniques can even restore reading vision and turn back the clock on your eyes by 20 years or more. Cataracts can be slowed by taking vitamins, especially Vitamin C and antioxidants, wearing sunglasses, and smoking cessation.

It is important to understand the aging eye and all the treatments and preventative care that can be implemented to save one of the most precious gifts you have: your vision.

 

The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

The Sixties.............War, peace, expressing yourself, the Civil Rights movement, and the Beatles. One of the biggest hits of the era was “Here Comes the Sun” by the Beatles. 

In the health care world, the sun plays a balancing role in delivering its rays to our bodies to help produce Vitamin D. Many people who work indoors are directed to take Vitamin D supplements because of lack of exposure to the sunshine, Conversely, people who are outside a lot have a risk of overexposure causing skin cancer.

The eyes are at risk as well. If sunglasses are not worn, there is a greater risk for cataracts or skin cancers of the eyelids. It is important to know that not all sunglasses are made alike. UV A, B, and C rays are the harmful rays that sunglasses need to protect us from.

However, many over the counter sunglasses do not have UV protection built into the lenses, which can actually cause more damage especially in children. 80% of sun exposure in our lives comes in childhood. Without UV protection in sunglasses, the pupil which dilates more behind a sun lens, allows more of the harmful rays of the sun in.

The whole point is for the consumer to be aware that it is vital to buy sunwear that has UV protection built into the lenses. Polarized lenses protect the eyes from the sun as well as from glare from the road and water.

Fisherman love polarized lenses because you can see the fish right through the water. People who boat also claim their vision is better because glare off the water is reduced.

So next time you hear the famous Beatles hit, remember to be educated on the best products for your eyes, to keep you healthy and prevent cataracts and cancer. Remember, UV protection in sunglasses is the way to go.

 

The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.

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